Tag Archives: uniqueness

Difference and the second question

Different is better than better.  –Tyra “Banx” Banks, personal branding lecturer at Stanford University

Let’s climb into the mind of your potential customer or potential distributor.

We’ve been in a discussion why your company’s product is better than any similar product on the marketplace. So far, yours looks the best to solve my problem.

Now you are talking on the level of uniformity again. You and all your colleagues who are marketing the same company’s products… what makes you different from each other?

In other words, how will your uniqueness help me use the product or build a team?

This is an interesting set of questions for you as a distributor.

When you talk about your unique qualities, be sure to describe them in terms of how you will help or honor the potential customer/distributor.

For example, you might be one of only a handful of engineers in your company. Go further and describe how your background is an advantage to them:

In my (previous/current) work as an engineer, I am trained to pay close attention to details and to teach things methodically. I believe the details are important and I will do my best to help you find the answers to your ongoing questions. Of course, too much detail can be overwhelming, so we’ll concentrate on the basic questions of (how you operate your account/run your business).

From my (previous/current) work as a bookkeeper, I know watching the budget is important. Starting a business requires an initial investment and strategic purchases to keep it running. Let’s develop a step-by-step marketing plan, to earn your initial investment back as quickly as possible, so your business is profitable.

In my (previous/current) work as a computer software trainer, I (taught/teach) people how to operate their computers. I (specialized/specialize) in beginners who were scared to touch the machine. After you watch the training videos, if you have questions, I will take you step-by-step to help you learn how to run the app and web site.

“Different” doesn’t have to mean “top of the heap in the company.” Instead, choose advantages from your other work (or hobby) experiences. Those will set you apart, regardless of the rank you hold in your company.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #trsc #therocketsciencecoach #difference #tyrabanks #banx #differenceandthesecondquestion #directsales #leveragedsales #partyplan #mlm #networkmarketing #different #difference

Lessons from a 1980’s shopping mall

The 1980’s was the heyday of indoor shopping malls in the United States. The closest mall to our house had more than 80 stores including 5 major department stores, so there were plenty of choices.

(In this post I will change the names of the stores, for copyright’s sake.)

We knew if we wanted something artsy and ahead-of-the-trend, we shopped in Solomon’s.

Prom or career-defining business interview coming soon? Hit the racks at Cube for clothes that would impress.

If Cube was too expensive, we combed the selection at Seaform, which had still-very-nice business wear, and even a small “Tall Ladies” section.

Janice’s had “knock-offs” (imitations) of several designers displayed at Cube and Seaform.

And if we simply wanted a basic pair of blue jeans, we headed to Deerfield.

The gist of it: every store had different clothes and fit different budgets. There was something for everyone, and we knew which store would likely have what we wanted.

By the early 1990’s, I noticed Solomon’s and Deerfield kept their unique identities, but three of major department stores started carrying the same designers. Many of the women’s clothes were identical. Our shopping strategy changed in response.

Was the item likely to be carried by Cube, Seaform, or Janice’s? Head to the store that was likely within budget. Check out the prices and sizes. Now walk into the other two department stores and compare. Walk to the store that had the lowest price for the item, and buy it there.

What happened?

Instead of being unique, the three stores in question offered the same merchandise with no significant differentiation in customer service or perks. So the only thing separating them was price… beyond the possibility of bragging that one “bought it at Cube.”

The stores became interchangeable commodities, and that was their downfall.

Even if that sweater was available at Cube, why would one want to spend more for an identical item? The brand name didn’t justify spending $10-$15 more, in my and most of my friends’ eyes.

We face an identical issue in network marketing, within our companies.

Each independent distributor within a company markets the same products.

So, why would the potential customer buy from YOU?

Price wars among distributors reek of desperation, so steer clear of that.

To stay away from becoming a commodity, do some deep thinking about what makes your distributorship unique.

Here are some ideas.

Do you offer special and memorable customer service? Do you gift wrap physical items? Do you donate to charity for every item purchased? Do you thank your clients in a way that they enjoy and remember? Do you remember and honor your clients for the special occasions in their lives?

Remember, your worth is much more than the sale price of the items you market.

Become comfortable with being you, express that uniqueness in the way you take care of your customer’s needs, and that will build a loyal customer base.

People appreciate being appreciated.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #networkmarketing #shopping #lessons #lessonsfroma1980sshoppingmall #unique #appreciation