Category Archives: Business Advice

First applause

One of my colleagues achieved her first rank advancement a few days ago.

In her 5+ years with this company, I have witnessed her ongoing heartfelt praise and use of our products. She gathered many customers and uses the products herself on a daily basis.

Her journey to this point has been challenging. She handled many overlapping episodes of family emergencies that required her focus, a yearlong marketing project known well in her own county, and several private struggles. For more than 3 years she marketed her business in a weekly business referrals group that has mandatory attendance rules. She has excellent communication and presentation skills. And finally her business has acquired the necessary number of distributors in the necessary arrangement and the required sales volume.

She paused when necessary, yet she never quit.

That’s why we are excited as we wait for the weekly announcements of the new rank advancements. She will receive an individual post praising her accomplishment, including her photo in a meme and a unique message (not just changing the name) from the vice president of field operations. (She will also receive a mailed physical certificate and lapel pin in the coming weeks.)

It’s her first company-wide applause from the corporate office.

It’s a big deal.

What is your company’s procedure for a PUBLIC acknowledgment of the first rank advancement? Do they provide sharable social media announcements as well as tangible “bling?” Do they honor such people at your annual convention?

What do you do for your team members when they rank advance? Do you give a speedy acknowledgement (perhaps a text, Message, or social media post)? Do you treat slow accomplishments with as much respect and fanfare as achievements by fast-moving distributors for achieving the same rank?

Bear in mind many people don’t advance quickly. Don’t act embarrassed by how long it takes someone to rank-advance. Instead, create a culture of loud and immediate acknowledgement. Your future team members are watching and asking themselves, If I put in the time and effort at a speed that works for me, will I receive the same respect?

The “unicorns” will always get their praise. Those who move quickly or dramatically are readily acknowledged. Many distributors dream of being a unicorn in their company, but many remain merely human. Be sure to give them the same respect as everyone else who achieved the rank.

As a leader, I feel the first rank advancement should be a HUGE deal, regardless of how long it takes to achieve it. As the saying goes, “What is rewarded is repeated.”

Care more about the rank advancement than the speed of its acquisition.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #leveragedsales #networkmarketing #partyplan #mlm #residual #residualincome #firstapplause #rankadvance

Advertisements

Lessons from a 1980’s shopping mall

The 1980’s was the heyday of indoor shopping malls in the United States. The closest mall to our house had more than 80 stores including 5 major department stores, so there were plenty of choices.

(In this post I will change the names of the stores, for copyright’s sake.)

We knew if we wanted something artsy and ahead-of-the-trend, we shopped in Solomon’s.

Prom or career-defining business interview coming soon? Hit the racks at Cube for clothes that would impress.

If Cube was too expensive, we combed the selection at Seaform, which had still-very-nice business wear, and even a small “Tall Ladies” section.

Janice’s had “knock-offs” (imitations) of several designers displayed at Cube and Seaform.

And if we simply wanted a basic pair of blue jeans, we headed to Deerfield.

The gist of it: every store had different clothes and fit different budgets. There was something for everyone, and we knew which store would likely have what we wanted.

By the early 1990’s, I noticed Solomon’s and Deerfield kept their unique identities, but three of major department stores started carrying the same designers. Many of the women’s clothes were identical. Our shopping strategy changed in response.

Was the item likely to be carried by Cube, Seaform, or Janice’s? Head to the store that was likely within budget. Check out the prices and sizes. Now walk into the other two department stores and compare. Walk to the store that had the lowest price for the item, and buy it there.

What happened?

Instead of being unique, the three stores in question offered the same merchandise with no significant differentiation in customer service or perks. So the only thing separating them was price… beyond the possibility of bragging that one “bought it at Cube.”

The stores became interchangeable commodities, and that was their downfall.

Even if that sweater was available at Cube, why would one want to spend more for an identical item? The brand name didn’t justify spending $10-$15 more, in my and most of my friends’ eyes.

We face an identical issue in network marketing, within our companies.

Each independent distributor within a company markets the same products.

So, why would the potential customer buy from YOU?

Price wars among distributors reek of desperation, so steer clear of that.

To stay away from becoming a commodity, do some deep thinking about what makes your distributorship unique.

Here are some ideas.

Do you offer special and memorable customer service? Do you gift wrap physical items? Do you donate to charity for every item purchased? Do you thank your clients in a way that they enjoy and remember? Do you remember and honor your clients for the special occasions in their lives?

Remember, your worth is much more than the sale price of the items you market.

Become comfortable with being you, express that uniqueness in the way you take care of your customer’s needs, and that will build a loyal customer base.

People appreciate being appreciated.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #networkmarketing #shopping #lessons #lessonsfroma1980sshoppingmall #unique #appreciation

How to get good at it

“You get good at it by being bad at it.”  –LRS

Of course, multiple attempts should lead to improvement. But along the way, remind yourself that every great presenter started as a bad presenter… or at least one who improved a lot along the journey.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #getgood #presenter #networkmarketing #directsales

How a bird with laryngitis still sings

In the last few weeks the pop singer Adele posted a tearful cancellation of her two most recent Wembly Stadium concerts.

She has struggled with vocal health issues for many years. At the end of this world tour, her doctors advised her to not sing the final two performances. And it was heartbreaking for her to let her fans down.

What would happen to you, if suddenly you could not perform in your job?

For most people in the 9-to-5 working world, that situation would end a career. The money would stop coming in.

However, Adele is a lot like you and me.

Our compensation has a passive income stream.

Singers call it royalties.

Actors call it “back end” percentages.

Network Marketers call it residuals.

Even though Adele’s gorgeous voice is silenced, perhaps for many years, she still gets paid every time her songs play on the radio. She had to practice and sing many many times before she recorded and released the first crucial recording of her popular-play song. That action opened the passive income stream.

Do your critical step task, and the passive income is yours.

So when the recording session ends, the director of the blockbuster movie yells “cut and print”, or you and I enroll a subscription client… we join that club of people who get paid while we sleep.

Welcome to The Club. Even when you have no voice left to shout the good news to the world.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #laryngitis #adele #residualincome

 

Build the friendship

Yesterday I was driving and wondering whom I should call, just to say hi.

“Joy K.” was my brain’s answer. She is a distributor in my company, but not in my organization.

I pushed the earbud into my right ear and voice-dialed the call.

She was in the grocery store when I reached her. And she was pleasantly startled to hear from me.

“You made my day!” was one of her comments.

Readers, remember that the people IN your company are part of your network. What are you doing to create friendships and trust within your company? Even though you are “competitors,” you also have a common cause to spread the word about your company.

If your company policies allow it, I challenge you to reach out just to say hi and build a friendship with a distributor who is NOT in your organization… some one from whom you receive no income from their activities.

If you are not allowed to do that. then reach out in friendship to a distributor in your organization whom you rarely talk with… perhaps someone 2 or 3 layers deep in your team. You might not seem like a big deal to yourself, but to them you are likely That Famous Person They Only See In Their Genealogy Or Hear On A Conference Call.

And whomever you talk to, avoid talking about business. Ask them what event they are looking forward to this summer, their favorite summer food, what movie they’ve seen lately. See if you can find some social-life common ground.

Build the friendship. It just might make their day.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #crosspollination #appreciation #buildthefriendship

Safe spaces and “Beginner’s Mind”

For many distributors this is their first experience with network marketing. For some, it is their first experience with being an entrepreneur.

When they don’t know what to do, they look to their sponsor or trainer… otherwise known as “the voice of experience.”

(Of course you’re more experienced than them… even by mere minutes… with your company.)

To get confident and competent with your company’s product and compensation plan presentation, your new distributor will need practice.

Here’s my question.

Are you allowing an encouraging environment for your new people to try, try again, and try yet again until they master the process?

It might be best for the early attempts to be made in private, such as in a separate distributors-only training session, instead of during your weekly business presentation.

It might seem easy to you. But an effective trainer will see the process through the eyes of a beginner. This is known as “Beginner’s Mind.”

If you are losing patience with your newbie, think hard about when you were learning the same thing, or when another distributor was struggling with the same concept. What was the “key” to mastery that you can pass along? Can you kindly model the effective behavior, then have them mimic it?

If you act impatient and harshly judgmental about the learning curve or post-speech evaluation, your new distributor will judge their own performance in that manner… and will pass that attitude to their new people. Eventually you will end up doing most of the group’s presentations because only a few people will pass your “high” standards.

Remember, the audience doesn’t care about perfection.

Instead the audience members are asking themselves, “Can I do what the person at the front of the room is doing? Would I feel comfortable doing it? Do I have to become an expert, a slick presenter, or a flawless robot to be successful in this company?” When the presenter makes some minor flubs, the business seems much more doable by the ordinary person.

If you act patient and confident that your newbie will learn this, then they will.

As the saying goes, “Every winner was once a beginner.”

Help bring their inner winner to the surface through patient coaching.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #networkmarketing #mastery #mimic #winner #beginner #beginnersmind

What do you celebrate?

This weekend will mark my eleventh anniversary with my current network marketing company.

This is my longest work project, thus far. I compare it to the lengths of my engineering career, working as a mortgage loan officer, and my previous network marketing company.

How do you view your business anniversary? Is it a time of joy, or is it a reminder of “everything I haven’t accomplished”? Do you hold a celebration, or is it simply another day?

Whatever your accomplishments are, know that you can celebrate your longevity in the profession. And that is important.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #whatdoyoucelebrate #networkmarketing #celebrate