Monthly Archives: May 2018

Looking at “Balance” in a new way

In many discussions regarding building a business, the terminology of “balance” gets thrown around.

Advice varies: from “You should pursue balance in your life” to “Forget balance, you have to go way out of balance to get anything big done in life.”

I think either extreme is unhelpful.

What if we approached “balance” as a system of maintaining many issues, while expanding our efforts on one or two ideas?

The idea is, don’t completely drop the things that are foundational while you pursue a big project.

The foundational items are the ones whose effects are seen long-term.

If we ignore eating healthy because it takes “too much time to cook,” eventually the hamburgers and soft drinks will catch up to us… through low energy levels, high blood pressure, and the subtle-yet-important effects of lack of minerals.

If we skip the workouts because “going to the gym doesn’t put money in my wallet,” eventually our energy levels fall and our thought processes become sluggish.

If we consistently spend little quality time with our families for an extended period of time, eventually they pull away from us.

But when we’re concentrating on building the business, SOMETHING has to be put aside.

For each of us, that “Something” may be different.

I suggest you look at the things that entertain but do not create strong leadership skills. I’m speaking of zoning out in front of the tv every night, spending hours scrolling through social media, or playing video games for hours on end. Every person has their weakness.

Be selective. Don’t give something up entirely if you truly enjoy it, because austerity  usually backfires.

For example, what if you choose ONE hour of tv to watch per day, or per week? What tv show REALLY inspires you? (I bet it’s not the news.) Record it with Tivo it and watch it afterward, (even immediately afterward if you suspect your willpower might falter while watching the live broadcast.) And if you truly feel you need the news to stay informed, listen to it in the car on the way to work, or view news articles while riding public transit. (Remember to use earphones while riding the train or bus!)

If you enjoy social media, perhaps set a timer (not just watch the clock) to allow yourself to indulge in your favorite platform for a set time (perhaps 10 minutes). Let the timer be the “bad guy.” Then set the timer to keep track until you allow yourself another social media surfing time (say, in 60 minutes).

Make a rule that helps you: for example, during the workday, if you mostly work from your computer, make your rule that you will only look at social media from your phone. During worktimes log out of the app, don’t let the app save your password, and remove the app from the background processes. If possible, put your phone across the room (so you have to get up to reach it), or put it in another room.

Make it a little difficult to “just check in for a moment.” Turn off notifications. Set a password that is about 10-15 characters long, remembering to NOT let the app save your password, and if you want to log in you will type it. I do this, because I use my phone to send texts as part of my marketing outreach, and sometimes out of boredom or frustration I find myself tapping the app to look at social media… but by the time I am nearly finished typing the long password, I consciously realize what I’m doing, so then I stop myself… at least until the timer rings.

Here are some other ideas.

If you have young children, is it necessary for you to watch every practice? Would it be OK to use some of that time to make phone calls or send business-building texts while sitting on the bleachers or in the car… however, be sure to have phone turned off and be fully present for the recitals and big games. Be there for the milestones.

If eating healthy is important but cooking takes a long time, consider cooking in big batches and freezing some meal-sized portions. My parents call this “making Big Food.” On your “working evenings” you simply reheat the frozen portion and serve with a shortcut-healthy side dish (like prewashed bagged salad). Or 1-2-3 nights a week you get takeout, and those are the evenings you spend working your business.

Something’s gotta give when you put major hours toward building a business. I hope these ideas give you inspiration to flex your schedule in a healthy way.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #trsc #balance #lookingatbalanceinanewway

Advertisements

Quality vs Quantity

As I get older I notice I am much more interested in quality.

For example, quality relationships. When people reciprocate when asked for reasonable help occasionally, and more importantly where people interact on a meaningful basis between requests for assistance.

I live in Germany, so the GDPR privacy rules go into effect tomorrow in a direct way for our household. The rules will affect communicating with European Union citizens living abroad, as well as with residents of the EU who hold citizenship of any country in the world (such as myself and my husband).

I have been preparing for the new rules by searching my database for people who meet any of those criteria, then reaching out to them in a typed (nonvoice) way to receive explicit permission to keep them in my (privately-accessed, password protected, stored online) database. I used mobile phone texting, social media private messaging, email, or even mailing them a greeting card.

Most people have been fine with all of it, a few asked me to hold only their name and phone number/email, one asked me to remove her information completely.

Some people have not responded at all.

So after I post this blog entry, I will remove the database entries for the nonresponders. If they reply affirmatively later on, I will be able to add them back. But in the meanwhile, I know not to spend energy on those relationships.

That frees my energy and time to focus on the people who at least give me the courtesy of a positive reply.

Focusing on quality can create an initial wince, and the benefits come afterward.

And, thank you for continuing to subscribe to this blog.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #gdpr #businessowner #qualityvsquantity

P.S. I posted a Privacy Statement yesterday. Please read it if you have any concerns regarding how data is handled. Also realize there is an unsubscribe button at the bottom of every emailed notice each time I publish a new blog entry. These options are provided so you have control of information as you interact online.

The powerful ear

Systems aren’t perfect, things break, and websites need fixing.

Those things happen in every company, occasionally.

But where do you complain about the flaws?

On your personal social media? In a distributors-only forum? With the home office department that takes responsibility for implementing changes?

All three speak to powerful people.

The first avenue speaks to the public: the ones who were part of your company or who have yet to join. They might hear an unspoken message of, “This doesn’t work, we’re a so-called ‘hot mess,’ get back to us after we’ve figured out this crisis.” You run the risk of reinforcing any existing stereotypical negative images of your company and profession. In this case you’re impacting the long-term future of the company in a negative way.

The second avenue speaks to the distributors in your company, and the most tender ears there are the newbies. Their responses will likely be more extreme than the seasoned distributors. You run the risk of scaring them away because of your momentary frustration. In this case you’re negatively impacting the immediate and short term growth of the company.

The last avenue speaks to the people who can fix the problem. I know they prefer when people report the cause-and-effect chain of events instead of using inflammatory words to merely complain about it. Like the first avenue, you’re impacting the long-term future of the company. Only these ears are the ones who can implement a solution. So the effect is positive.

Long-term positive wins my vote every day.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

P.S. Leaders: Your clients and distributors should be told about known pitfalls they are likely to encounter. But how can you tell if you are informing versus complaining? See if you agree with my definitions.

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #thepowerfulear #leveragedsales #networkmarketing #mlm #directsales #partyplan #mindset #leadership

 

 

Whom should I tell?

Imagine your company’s web site botched your end-of-week order. You feel angry and frustrated. You have the urge to TELL SOMEONE.

The biggest question to ask yourself is, “Is this complaining, informing, or working toward a solution?”

Complaining: This awful thing is happening! It isn’t fair! Why didn’t someone anticipate this?? (Said with the intent to broadcast far and wide in order to – consciously or not – garner sympathy or stir outrage)

Informing: The website is not functioning correctly. Here’s what to expect and how to work around the issue. (said in a more focused and non-inflammatory way, concentrating on channels used by current users of the site)

Working toward a solution: Hello, I’m using the ABC feature, and when I do DEF, it does UVW. I would like it to do XYZ. (a private and calmly-worded communication from you to the Information Technology department, using details and sequences of events)

The more your communication is private, calm, and feature-focused, the more likely it is to be working toward a solution.

It’s true other distributors should know any pressing issues (relative to their experience level and likelihood of encountering them). However, take care that you are informing them instead of merely stirring up emotions.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #whomshoulditell #complaining #informing #workingtowardasolution #partyplan #directsales #distributors #mlm #networkmarketing #leveragedsales

The glow beneath your feet

When we think of being inspired, we tend to think of encouragement and compliments given to us from someone with a higher standing: higher rank in the company, for instance.

Your task, if you choose to accept it:  think about encouragement you received from someone in your company whose promotion-level rank is lower than yours (or equal to yours if you are just starting out).

Reach out to one such person this week in a text, message, card, or phone call. Let them know how their words positively affected you.

I’ve experienced that action from highly-ranked distributors in my company, and it’s flattering. It also taught me that I have something of value to contribute, regardless of my rank within the company.

Go ahead, make their day!

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™

#lynnselwa #therocketsciencecoach #theglowbeneathyourfeet #inspiration #encouragement #leveragedsales #partyplan #directsales #mlm #networkmarketing #reachout