Stop the “Rank-Shaming”

As I made my way through primary and high school here in the United States, I was grouped with people of the same age. In other words, people who had spent the same amount of time on this planet.

Many of us were told in Kindergarten, “you are a member of the Class of (    )”, which was simply 13 years into the future. Of course the well-meaning parents were talking about the year we would graduate from high school, which seemed impossibly far away to me as a young child.

Academic success was based on a steady yearly progression to meet that long-term calendar goal. In school, we were expected to master certain amounts of material each year– some more completely than others– which would allow our group to progress to the next level.

If any of us fell behind an “average” expectation of mastery, we were  “held back a year” to repeat those lessons. Occasionally a student was allowed to “skip forward” a grade, but that student was typically pitied and ostracized by the new classmates as well as friends from the former group.

Staying with one’s same-age classmates is seen as the best choice by nearly all parents and students alike. Any deviation is seen as suspect.

Our “rank” or authority in the school was based on how many grade levels we finished. In high school, first year students were known as “freshmen,” and everyone wanted to be a powerful last-year student, a “senior.” Even in college, it was assumed the student will graduate in 4 years with a bachelor’s degree. Taking longer would evoke amused glances and comments of, “You have been partying too hard, you need to buckle down and get to work.”

Again, slipping behind the expected pace of your peers is seen as suspect. It didn’t matter what type of degree you were earning… you were expected to keep up. And success was assumed to happen in a certain amount of TIME… for the average student.

When we enter the Network Marketing profession, suddenly time is not the grouping factor. We launch our businesses on the same day as many other distributors. Some create a thriving team within months, and others take years or more… or give up after years of frustration.

In our profession, SKILLS are the “grouping factor.” People with the leadership, sponsoring, and coaching skills needed in Network Marketing will grow teams more quickly. The amount of TIME spent as a Distributor is almost irrelevant.

So when people who have a “School” mindset pass harsh judgment on you, remember they are programmed to expect certain results simply from the amount of TIME you have owned your business. And realize some distributors who build teams quickly may have that same time-based attitude.

Don’t subject your team or colleagues to a similar unfair standard. Instead, build their confidence by speaking words of encouragement and praise, regardless of what rank or promotion level they hold in your company.

Rank indicates one’s completed accomplishments, not the level of commitment. Think about this: how many highly-ranked people in your company have left and joined a different company?

If you’re looking for advice about building a team quickly, or how to create a massive residual income stream, talk to those who have done so. But don’t judge the slower-builders harshly. They may be handling more situations in their personal lives than you can imagine. This proverb comes to mind: “Don’t judge me until you’ve walked a mile in my shoes.”

One colleague in this profession told me, “Distributors who take quote ‘a long time’ to reach their rank promotions tend to stay with that company for the long-term. They learn to discipline their disappointments.” (Thank you, Susan Bristol, for your words of wisdom!)

Stop judging people by what rank they have. Start building their confidence with praise and encouragement.

–LYnn Selwa, “The Rocket Science Coach” ™ #networkmarketing #LynnSelwa #LynnSelwaTRSC #TheRocketScienceCoach #judgment #residualincome #MLM #DisciplineTheirDisappointments #SusanBristol #StopTheRankShaming #Confidence #Commitment

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